Ingredient spotlight: rye flour

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Rye flour

I know The Catcher in the Rye (which I have now found out is actually a different type of rye? Who knew?). I also know there is a town called Rye (which looking back on it is a weird name tbh). And, I know that in Germany (where I live) a lot of baking is done with rye, and Germans are some of the highest per capita rye consumers worldwide. 

For me, therefore, rye isn’t exactly a total novelty. I don’t feel like I am writing an ingredient spotlight for wheat flour (should I?), but maybe for cake flour or something like that. It’s just a bit different, but it’s mostly just similar. What can I say, to me this is a regular degular flour that can be found even at the cheapest discounter grocery stores. 

Nutrition

In general, as with other varieties, the darker the flour the more protein it probably contains. If you are trying to mindfully consume more nutrient-dense foods, wholegrain flours are usually a great option. Since rye does contain gluten, it is not suitable for people who are gluten sensitive or intolerant, or anyone who is not eating gluten for whatever reason. 

Rye flour is a rich source of esseneital nutrients, such as dietary fiber, protein, niacin and vitamin B6, along with manganese and phosphorus. (You can always find more detailed nutritional information in the sources. I packed some useful links in there for you!)

Uses/Recipes

I have used rye flour in a number of past baking projects, including in apple cake and bagels. Both turned out excellent, though I would say both were only about 30% rye flour. Breads made from rye, such as pumpernickel, is very common here in Germany so I have eaten that many times, though truthfully, I have not tried my hand at making it myself. I do plan to try that soon, and will keep you posted! 

Long story short, I think rye flour is a great ingredient to add to your pantry to spruce things up every now and again. Just add a tablespoon or two of rye flour to some pastry you’ve made before and see how you like it. This is a totally approachable new ingredient, and I absolutely believe in you learning what you like to do with it! You got this! There is almost no way to do this wrong, and even if you do, by the end you will have learned something! Try it out and report back. You are doing fantastic. You are trying your best. And you are getting better every day!

Sources

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rye
  2. http://theryebaker.com/rye-flour/
  3. https://bakerpedia.com/ingredients/rye-flour/
  4. https://www.kingarthurbaking.com/blog/2020/09/28/types-of-rye-flour
  5. https://www.bobsredmill.com/organic-dark-rye-flour.html

General caveats that I feel compelled to add: 

I am *NOT* a nutritionist. I am just someone who is deeply interested in and profoundly committed to eating delicious food only. In seeking to reach this goal, I am often trying out random new ingredients that I come across. These ingredients are ones I may not know anything about, and so I am simply sharing my notes with you. I will be updating these as I go along and learn more. I will also link to more recipes that use these ingredients, so that you can try them yourself. If you have any allergies or intolerances, please consult with an actual doctor who can guarantee you accurate information.

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